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Aly Ben Salem, Les fiancés, Circa 1956, Mixed media on paper, 76 x 55 cm
Gouider Triki, Le prix de la liberté, 2014, Acrylic on canvas, 140.1 x 100.2 cm
Mahjoub Ben Bella, Untitled, 1988, Oil on canvas, 195 x 130 cm
Jelal Ben Abdallah, La Lecture du Coran, Oil on panel, 97 x 67 cm
Nja Mahdaoui, Awj 2, 2016, Ink on linen canvas, 150 x 150 cm
Nejib Belkhodja, Première lueur, 2006, Oil on canvas, 60 x 60 cm
Hatim Elmekki, Venus…et toutes ses dents, Circa 1955, Oil on wood panel, 90.2 x 75.2 cm
Fair view, Abu Dhabi Art 2017 © Pia Torelli
Fair view, Abu Dhabi Art 2017 © Pia Torelli - copy
  • Abu Dhabi Art

    November 8 - 11, 2017

    Booth X208

    Manarat Al Saadiyat, Saadiyat Cultural District

    Elmarsa is pleased to participate in the eleventh edition of Abu Dhabi Art with a group exhibition of leading Modern and Contemporary artists from the Middle East and North Africa. This selection of diverse and multi-disciplinary important works spans from the second half of the twentieth century to today and offers a perspective on the development of modern art from the Maghreb by shedding light on how this particular chapter fits into the wider art history of Arab art.

    This exhibition begins with the figurative paintings of early Tunisian modernists Yahia Turki (1903-1969), Aly Ben Salem (1910-2001), Ammar Farhat (1911-1987), Jelal Ben Abdallah (b. 1921), and Abdekaziz Gorgi (1928-2008) whose realist representations of life in the Maghreb mark a shift away from the orientalist academic style of painting taught in local art schools established by the French Protectorate. A period of experimentation follows as modern artists across the region from Lebanese artists Chafic Abboud (1926-2004) and Huguette Caland (b. 1931) to Nejib Belkhodja (1933-2007) explore abstraction. Similarly, actively politically-engaged artists like Hatim Elmekki (1918-2003) introduce an expressive representation of the struggle for independence in their paintings.